Thursday, April 11, 2013

A Presentation Pistol

Back to the Colt Firearms collection after one day to honor the University of Connecticut women's basketball team.

This pistol was made in 1965.  It is based on a 1911 model.  The sign to the right of this pistol describes the ornamentation and indicates that it was presented to the President of the Colt Military Division.  (Click on the photo to enlarge it and read the sign.)

So, why does the State Library have an elaborate collection of firearms?  Because armaments have been a cornerstone of the Connecticut economy for several centuries.

Even though some categories of weapons are banned for purchase in Connecticut, those same weapons may lawfully be purchased in nearly all other states.  And, even if more extensive restrictions are adopted, there will always be weapons produced for the military, for law enforcement, for hunters, and for individuals who choose to own whatever weapons continue to be legal for citizens to own.

Where are many of those weapons currently made?  Connecticut.

21 comments:

John "By Stargoose And Hanglands" said...

Sounds like the situation nationally in both the US and the UK - trying to prevent international conflict with one hand while selling them the weapons with the other. Such a beautiful pistol but with the usual horrific possibilities.

Cezar and Léia said...

sad things these weapons!
Léia

Lowell said...

That's what we used in the Navy - a 1911. I had one for awhile but decided I didn't need it and sold it. This is a beauty. I never had a Colt, though - too expensive.

Sorry about your trip. I like the manner in which you described your frustration. So often we miss the bigger picture!

Taken For Granted said...

That is a beautiful example of an iconic side arm. This design was so successful that it is still in production. Best that this gun be on public display in a collection.

Dave-CostaRicaDailyPhoto.com said...

I read in the newspaper in Arizona yesterday about a gun company that has decided to move out of Connecticut because of the landmark massacre-prevention legislation passed by Connecticut.

Sharon said...

I don't think I've ever seen such an ornate gun.

Halcyon said...

Very fancy.
Rather ironic that all these things are made in Connecticut.

Sylvia K said...

I agree with Halcyon! I never had strong feelings about guns for a long time. My husband was a member of the US Modern Pentathlon Team and shooting was among the five sports they competed in and I even learned to shoot as well, but times change and it's hard to view guns in the same way as I did before. Great capture as always! Love the detail.

EG CameraGirl said...

Hmmm. I had no idea Connecticut was so into armaments.

Malyss said...

When a gun comes to be such a master piece of art,Connecticut is forgiven.. :o)

RedPat said...

Lots of little details on this one! Good for it to be in a museum.

VP said...

Almost incredible craftsmanship!

Doronette NF said...

very elegant

JM said...

I don't like guns but this is a work of art.

Leslie D. said...

Yes beautifully made. As an American I'm a staunch defender of freedom but how do we determine when a weapon has fallen into the wrong hands?

Karl Demetz said...

Huui... beautiful craftsmanship, and a museum is the right place for guns.

William Kendall said...

Quite fine craftmanship.

Bob Crowe said...

I guessed that was Pershing on the left before I looked at the bigger image. 5 bonus points. I am not a gun person but anyone can appreciate the marvelous workmanship.

Randy said...

That's a fancy gun.

Birdman said...

Remember Newtown!

Kate said...

That's a real conundrum for Connecticut when gun control is considered.