Friday, August 12, 2011

Glastonbury-Rocky Hill Ferry

Students, take your seats.

The ferry across the Connecticut River between Glastonbury and Rocky Hill has been in continuous operation since 1655.  It is the longest continuously operating ferry service in the country.


Because of Connecticut's budget woes,  the State plans to shut the ferry service down.  It is perhaps the least necessary governmental service in the state.  If the State must prioritize its spending, it is hard to argue in favor of a ferry service used by small numbers of local people, especially when there are modern bridges in the same towns.  On the other hand, the service costs peanuts.  Shutting it down will save little and will do nothing to address the state's deficit.  And, an irreplaceable part of the State's heritage will be lost. 

OK, students, take out your keyboards.  Discuss.

If you like seeing other photographs with reflections, please visit James' website, Weekend Reflections.

Click to see the rules and to take a badge for yourself.

34 comments:

Steffe said...

Wow in operation for that long. That is impressive.

PerthDailyPhoto said...

I love this post, how absolutely fabulous this service has been going so long, you cannot let them close it down, come on Jack get out there and chain yourself to something that will do the job of stopping them. It's such a darling boat too. Come on students...revolt..!! Anyway have a great weekend Jack..

Mo said...

Major cuts here too that will mean changes we may regret

Dianne said...

Nothing beats a ferry ride Jack - I think it should stay because as you said - it's not going to change the state of the deficit one iota.

Halcyon said...

Sad times... there's no good solution. :(

Bruce Clark said...

There is much more they can cut than a seasonal ferry to save money. How about we start with the proposed bus link between Hartford and New Britain for $500 million.

Regina K said...

The budgets woes are a crisis and it doesn't seem as though our politicians have a clue of what to do. Cutting something as insignificant as a ferry with little reward to the budget seems futile but the government can say it did something. I hate losing our historical presence.

Birdman said...

Save a little? Lose a lot? Dilemma? History will again probably bit the dust.

Kate said...

I hope that Birdman's prediction is wrong. There are myriad ways to cut expenses that could alleviate some of the states' economic issues, in many states in our fair land. I think that Perth's Daily Photo's suggestion of action on your part is terrific. Go for it Jack; we're counting on you and will be watching!

Virginia said...

I'm getting more cynical by the m inute. Geezzzzz.
V

Sharon said...

That would be a shame since it's been in business so long.

JM said...

The same happened here with some old railroads in the countryside. Instead of improving them for touristic purposes, politicians simply decided to close and abandone them and now no one can enjoy the unique and gorgeous sceneries, not to mention the cute old station buildings that are falling apart. It's a shame!

Lois said...

I hate seeing this happen. There must be some way to save it!

'Tsuki said...

I hope they'll keep it... And if they don't, you will have save it in your very own way, Jack, by taking a picture of it and sharing it with us : the ferry will stay in our memories, like that.

Sylvia K said...

Oh, crap, don't get me started!! How sad to lose something with so much history and just how much is it actually going to save??? Government/politicians ideas for saving money are, as usual, useless and a real shame in this case! Have a great day anyway, Jack!!

Sylvia

Dyche Designs said...

Beautiful shot . . . it would be such a shame to loose something like that.

Malyss said...

We have exactly the same problem here with small railways lines, used by a few people, BUT so cheap, protecting environnement, helping people who have no cars..and of great historical interest. Of course, our politic men , who have cars with drivers, never use them..and want to stop them.. let's create an international organisation for the protection of those kinds of things(or for political men extermination, I let you the choice! :o))

Luis Gomez said...

Jack, it is a great post and a wonderful shot. I am so with you. Why closed down something that has historical value and that would bring in so little. Makes no sense.

RedPat said...

Axing this service to appear as if doing something is criminal!

joo said...

Sad!I'm with Luis, there's no sense in closing it down! Love your photo.

jennyfreckles said...

It's a dilemma repeated often. What sometimes happens here is that the authorities close the service and someone (a trust) takes it over and runs it using volunteers, as a tourist attraction. But then its existence would be very precarious.

VP said...

Not much to discuss here: long live the ferry!

EG Wow said...

WOW! That's quite a record to have been running so long!

cieldequimper said...

Just another bureaucratic savings idea. Then in 20 years time they'll say, hey we need a ferry to build the community spirit back up. Duh.

May it survive.

Lynette Killam said...

What a great little boat! I hate to think of it being retired, but it's happening here in Vancouver, too. Efficiency before sentimentality...

Cildemer said...

Very interesting post! And yes, it is sad that some nice things of the past are bound to disappear!
Hope it will be used as a tourist attraction at least;o)

Thanks for sharing your wonderful pic, Jack;o)

***
Have a nice and happy week****

Lynette said...

This is a doggone shame, Jack. A shame!

Randy said...

That's horrible. Maybe the community should should create some kind of community fundraising group to save it.

Oakland Daily Photo said...

I was sure the date was a typo. Hard to know what to do. It was privately run for over 200 years; maybe a local group can take it over again even on a limited schedule. Motive power to the people!!

Cindy said...

I agree it would be a shame to shut this down.

Jacob said...

Did I read 1655? Must have started with the Native Americans...before the Europeans murdered them and stole their land! Maybe?

James said...

Wow! 1655 is even before Newtown was founded. I love historical places like this.

imajoebob said...

This is REALLY late to the game but...
It's service is NOT duplicated by any nearby bridges. The closest bridge that is not part of an Interstate highway is 20 miles North in Windsor Locks. The Arrigoni bridge in Middletown is only 10 miles, but it's approach and traffic are also "highway" class, not secondary road. And it seems to shut down every fifth year for major repairs.

Anonymous said...

Wrong. Route 3 bridge is just a couple of miles north and connects Main Street, Glastonbury with Silas Deane Highway in Wethersfield.