Saturday, August 8, 2015

Two Corners. One Win, One Loss.


The Elishah Wadsworth Tavern sits on the corner of the Albany Turnpike (Route 44) and Prospect Ave., the dividing line between Hartford and West Hartford.  Built in 1828, it became a residence long ago.  Over time, it deteriorated and had several cheap updates.  A couple of years ago a
builder specializing in fine homes gave it a top to bottom reconstruction.  


Half a mile to the west, on another busy corner, this 1928 Craftsman-style bungalow declined for years as an elderly homeowner was increasingly unable to keep it up.  A developer bought it and plans to demolish the house and build two new homes on the lot.  Preservation advocates 
discovered the plans too late.  The trees have been removed and  the developer is racing 
to take it down before he is stopped. 

15 comments:

John "By Stargoose And Hanglands" said...

Well, you can't win 'em all. But I suppose there comes a point when properties simply can't be renovated.

Andy said...

Sad.

Birdman said...

Surprised no one bought it with the trees still standing, revitalized and moved in. Yes, sad when a beauty fades.

Sharon Anck said...

That top one is gorgeous and it is truly sad about the second one. It has so much character, it's shame to lose it.

Sylvia K said...

A shame indeed the second house can't be saved!!! I do find it so sad when people prefer to teat down an old home like this and redo "their" way! I'll be holding good thoughts for the Preservation advocates!! Us "old broads" know just how sad that is!! Hopefully, they won't start tearing us down, too!!! Have a wonderful weekend, Jack!!

William Kendall said...

Sad to see. All too often, developers seem to care for little but how much money they can make.

RedPat said...

I love a good craftsman house, Jack! That is so sad to see. The top one is gorgeous!

Halcyon said...

What a shame. That bungalow is really cute and I'm sure could be restored with some TLC and elbow grease.

jennyfreckles said...

The first one is so beautifully proportioned, a very nice home for some lucky people. As for the second, people will often prefer to make money quickly rather than lavish the attention such a property would demand to bring it up to modern standards.

Kate said...

It is hard to believe that the first home was not in this pristine condition; it just aptly demonstrates what a good renovator can accomplish. The second photo shows a house of wonderful potential. Tear down and rebuild bigger (often with too many houses where the original stood) is an architectural blight that is occurring in cities across the country.

PerthDailyPhoto said...

The first restoration is splendid Jack, the style so classic and elegant.. the second looks like it's had it's best day and should probably retire 'gracefully' :)

Kay said...

That Craftsman still has promise. It's a pity it's being treated as a tear-down.

EG CameraGirl said...

The second photo is a perfect example of why I tend to dislike developers.

VP said...

This would be very hard to do even here: nobody would cut down trees of that size!

carolann said...

What a shame the second house.