Thursday, March 7, 2013

Daytripping: The Cartographer's Conundrum



Another current installation at MassMOCA is The Cartographer's Conundrum by Sanford Biggers.  I read the explanation twice and I still have no idea what Mr. Biggers had in mind.  If nothing else, his installation gives me an excuse to show you a big hall at MassMOCA.  What I liked was the way the colored plexiglass panels on the left cast light on the walls.

19 comments:

Cezar and Léia said...

I like a lot the room, the symmetry of the windows, lines and so on. Beautiful lights, stars and colors.
Léia

SRQ said...

What a terrific hall -- love all those windows. A baffling installation like this one is why I end up avoiding contemporary art. Kudos for you for trying to understand the artist's motivation.

Halcyon said...

What a great space!

Kate said...

I'm not sure about this space; guess I'd have to be there to appreciate it.

Sharon said...

It's almost as big as the great hall at the Tate Modern. I think I'd enjoy exploring this place.

Sylvia K said...

Interesting and colorful and certainly different! Great shots for the day, Jack!

Nita Davis said...

I can imagine all sorts of wonderful uses for a space like that. I too like the splashes of color created by the plexiglass. It does make me wonder what the creator had in mind, and reminds me of the contemporary art I saw a few days ago that prompted my latest post 'Lesson from the Pet Rock'.
By the way I really like the perspective on your second shot. Have a fantastic weekend.

EG CameraGirl said...

The coloured plexiglass leaves such lovely patterns on the floor and walls. I guess it's best to visit on a sunny day.

RedPat said...

Love this space and the exposed ceiling too! It's hard to tell what is the art installation isn't it/!

gardenbug said...

Is this what you read?
The Cartographer’s Conundrum is an installation, film and website inspired by artist, scholar and Afro-futurist John Biggers. A cousin of his subject, Sanford Biggers’s goal is to both study and expand the emerging genre of Afro-futurism, which engages science-fiction, cosmology and technology to create a new folklore of the African Diaspora. Biggers begins by traveling through western Africa along the same route John Biggers followed in the 1950s, meeting with colleagues and family members along the way. In its final form, this project includes a new multimedia installation by Sanford Biggers, as well as an exhibition, lecture, catalog and website chronicling John Biggers’s contributions to Afro-futurism.

Jack said...

Uh, yes, Gardenbug. I didn't even know that there was an emerging genre of Afro-futurism, nor how one engages science fiction, cosmology and technology to create a new folklore of the African Diaspora. Or any of the other stuff. It is a personal failing of mine, I am sure.

Randy said...

Looks like a great installation. Fascinating.

diane b said...

It looks like an unfinished installation to me. I agree though that the colours of light are fascinating.

Leslie D. said...

Curiosity compelled me to look up the installation. All I can say is ..huh?

VP said...

It comes to mind an old song of the Eagles: Wasted Time...

gardenbug said...

;)

PerthDailyPhoto said...

I love this space Jack, I can see many future fantastic installations being held here.

CaT said...

how huge! this is the art? or is it still in progress?
i like to see modern art, although often i wonder WTH the artist thought he was doing, and if he/she really thinks that what he/she is doing is really art, or that he/she is just enjoying the art of fooling everyone....

William Kendall said...

I'd be puzzled too, but it's a stunning hall!