Saturday, May 19, 2012

Another One Bites the Dust!


You have seen the American School for the Deaf before here and here.

The main building is Gallaudet Hall, named for the school's founder, Thomas Gallaudet (left). 

The building is 90 years old.  It is a classical brick building with a white cupola.  It is too big for a school with declining enrollment, and the high maintenance costs are strangling the school.  They studied doing a major renovation, but it was uneconomic and unfinanceable.  So, next week the school will start building a new, more efficient and smaller main building in front of Gallaudet Hall.  When it is finished, Gallaudet Hall will be torn down.

The story is here.

18 comments:

Birdman said...

Ya, and they call it progress.

JM said...

Torn down? No!!! What a shame. Well, old buildings are seldom tear down here and look at how many decay I've been posting...

Cezar and LĂ©ia said...

I like the statue a lot, so graceful!
God bless you!
Cezar

PerthDailyPhoto said...

Wonder why it wasn't possible to use the money they will be using for the new building to restore and refurbish the old and much nicer looking building. Interesting story Jack.

Regina K said...

Sad to see an old building be torn down. Hopefully they will reuse and restore pieces from the old building and use in new building.

Luis Gomez said...

Very nice shot Jack!

Lois Evensen said...

Losing beautiful old buildings is so sad. I am wondering if the design of the new one will be as distinguished-looking.

Dave-CostaRicaDailyPhoto.com said...

I suspect the new building will not be as stately or grand as the old building.

In Christchurch, New Zealand, there was a college downtown with old, classical English architecture, but it was too small and not modern enough for their needs. They built a new campus, but used the entire former college campus for an arts center.

It has studios and shops for artists, restaurants and wine bars, courtyards for crafts fairs, food booths, and musicians, etc.

Too bad they cannot a re-use for the original building.

Sylvia K said...

That is such a shame! And such a loss as well! I do hate to see it happen, but that seems to be most cities answer to everything, tear down and rebuild! Great captures, Jack, as always! Hope you enjoy a great weekend!

Malyss said...

This building seems to be too beautiful to be destroyed; that's sad! The statue will remain, I hope, as well as the spirit of the school..

RedPat said...

And the new building won't be as nice or as grand!

John "By Stargoose And Hanglands" said...

Improvements in hearing-aid technology, earlier diagnosis, better medical treatment, cochlea implants and use of other high-tech equipment make it increasingly possible for the deaf to be educated alongside their hearing peers, hence the falling intake of students. That's got to be a good thing. Just a shame that some other use can't be found for the building.

EG CameraGirl said...

Hmmm. North Americans need to talk to Europeans who have made buildings last for centuries, me thinks.

Randy said...

That is such a beautiful building. Too bad they are tearing it down. I had friends who studied at that school.

Madge Bloom said...

That's sad... she's a beauty! Sorry I been so quiet these last couple weeks, I’ve been really ill (now finally diagnosed with Whooping Cough even though I was immunized) and have had another very rough week.

Dianne said...

Such a pity Jack .... sad to see such a grand building reduced to dust.

Kate said...

I read the article, Jack, and appreciate the dilemma faced between those who support the new building and the preservationists. The case for a new building because of a fire hazard is a strong one. Gallaudet is a familiar name; I suppose because other schools have named their building after him? The statue underscores the need for strong adult mentors.

VP said...

Sad but seemingly inevitable, I like the statue...