Saturday, March 19, 2016

Naples Collects

23 members and friends of the Baker Museum at Artis Naples have loaned works for an exhibition,
Naples Collects.  Trust me, these folks don't have scribbles by their kids on their walls!
The exhibition was dazzling.


These are three gelatin prints by American photographer Bert Stern from 1962, 
six weeks before Marilyn Monroe died of an overdose.  


The woman straight ahead is a FINGERPRINT portrait by the American artist Chuck Close.
 The museum has been permitting photography for just a few months, provided there is no flash.
But there is no exception for photographing loaned works.  Fearless as I usually am, I was uncomfortable taking very close photos of works from private collections,
so I took pix of rooms or distant shots or partially cropped shots.



The exhibition's most fascinating work is a large 2008 mixed media work by American artist Gregory Scott -- painting, photography and video -- showing a painting of the artist looking into a repeating scene in which (in the video) he continually walks in and out of the scene.  Brilliant!

13 comments:

John "By Stargoose And Hanglands" said...

Chuck Close is an interesting guy. He suffers from prosopagnosia, which is the inability to recognise faces. As he describes it he can have dinner with someone in the evening but will not be able to recognise them in the morning - not the most promising start for a portrait artist, one might think. However he believes that his condition, rather than a handicap, is what inspires him to make pictures of the human face. I became interested in his work while caring for a young man who had the same condition - I had a head-start on everyone else as I was the only person who worked with him who had glasses and a big beard!

bill said...

Nice photos Jack, looks like a great museum. It's interesting that they allow photos to be taken which is a no no in most museums that I have been in.

Jacob said...

There was simply something special about Marilyn!

Jack said...

John, thanks for mentioning Chuck Close's "face blindness" condition. In addition, he suffered a neurological event several decades that left him wheelchair-bound and able to use his arms only by taping a paintbrush to his arm. It is astonishing what he can create despite being crippled by two different severe traumatic conditions.

Kate said...

Close is an amazing artist and a man of great strength and courage. I've been a fan for years. I'd like to see the mixed media piece because it is difficult to enjoy just through your description; my highly visual characteristics need to see it! I loved Marilyn Monroe and wish someone who loved her had been strong enough to help her!

PerthDailyPhoto said...

I tend to do the same thing in art galleries these days Jack, wider shots rather than close ups! How absolutely fascinating to read these facts about Chuck Close, he is an inspiring artist indeed, where many would give up he not only didn't but excelled, fantastic!

William Kendall said...

Strange to see Marilyn like that so soon before her death. I'm surprised by the details about Mr. Close's condition.

Our National Gallery lifted the restrictions, with some exceptions- temporary exhibits tend to be no-photos, and the odd work through the permanent collection is marked no photos, but everything else is fine, as long as you leave the flash off.

jennyfreckles said...

It would be nice to have such great stuff around your house! Love those Marilyn shots.

RedPat said...

God, Marilyn was beautiful! I love Chuck Close's work and the last piece looks so fascinating too! A super group of art their friends have, Jack!

Virginia said...

I am envious Jack. What a great exhibit. I saw an interesting repeat of a 60Minutes interview with people suffering from Close's face blindness. Fascinating.
V

SRQ said...

Interesting exhibit! The last shot is very intriguing -- would love to see it.

Bob Crowe said...

I'm a big Chuck Close fan. Saw one of the many portraits of Philips Glass at the Whitney around Christmas. That last image really twists your sense of time and place.

Kay said...

What treasures ordinary folks wouldn't otherwise be able to see. I was unfamiliar with Chuck Close. What a talent, especially in light of all he overcomes to do his work.